Events from November 01, 2023



  • - Presenter: Tisdale Arts Council
    - Location: Tisdale Community Library

    The exhibition All Conditioned Things presents the work of Saskatchewan artists, Jared Boechler and Nic Wilson, whose subject matter is embedded with symbolism or signifiers to explore concepts of mortality and impermanence. Both artists present mundane objects within their compositions, objects of domesticity, consumption and memorialization, many that are linked historically to traditional vanitas or memento mori paintings - including candles, ceramic vessels and flowers - that represent the passage of time, aging, decay, the transience of life, the futility of pleasure, and the certainty of death. Their compositions explore the values and narratives that these objects come to symbolize.

    This exhibition is curated by the Moose Jaw Museum & Art Gallery and toured through OSAC's Arts on the Move program.


  • - Presenter: La Ronge Arts Council
    - Location: Mistasinihk Place

    Surface All The Way Through is an exhibition of textile and text-based signs assembled from discarded plastic using hobby-craft techniques. It is an exploration of superficiality, distraction, reflection, containment, emotional blockages, consumerism, accumulation, and waste.

    The objects in this show are fabricated entirely of plastic: a material that I am endlessly attracted to for its shape-shifting mimicry and limitless supply of exciting surface qualities. As a toxic, uncontainable, and grossly over-produced material, it is also repulsive and surrounds me with dread and despair. It is between opposites that I have created these objects: working to both deflect and deal with my own conflicting attitudes in a time of vast uncertainty, inexpressible emotions, and constant horror.

    All materials in the show were rescued from their fate as discarded objects, collected either from my own personal consumption habits (packaging waste) or from the thrift store (craft supplies, projects, decorations).


  • - Presenter: Moose Jaw Cultural Centre
    - Location: Moose Jaw Cultural Centre

    Belinda Harrow, Jennifer McRorie, Elizabeth Munro, Wendy Winter

    Toured through OSAC’s Arts on the Move program, curated by Zoë Schneider.

    Family Ties explores familial bonds through the medium of embroidery. Halifax based artist Elizabeth Munro creates embroidered and surface manipulated non-objective ‘portraits’ of her parents that include audio elements to convey impressions of her parents from childhood; providing a nuanced concept of a portrait filtered through the subjective experience of one person’s memory. Regina based artist Belinda Harrow reproduces photographs of her maternal grandmother at different ages into embroideries. Floating within the outlines of the human figure are colourful depictions of animals. The outlines of the humans are black thread on a cream felt background while the animals are vibrantly hued. Moose Jaw based artist Jennifer McRorie reimagines her daughters’ drawings in ‘whitework’; a type of embroidery where the colour of embroidery threads are the same colour as the fabric on which they are embroidered. McRorie states that "I was compelled to make this series of work as I wanted to honour my daughter, who was born with a genetic disorder, to recognize her voice, abilities and creativity. I love her drawings, her wonderful expression of line and so by embroidering her drawings, I’m acknowledging that even though she is marked by her genetics or biology, she will make her own mark, hence the title of the series." Wendy Winter is a Regina based artist that uses embroidery on vintage and upcycled fabrics to interpret her daily life and personal philosophy. The artists in this exhibition use embroidery in different ways to consider the complexities of the bonds with our families.


  • - Presenter: Hudson Bay Allied Arts Council
    - Location: Brooks Hall

    Propagation explores the connections between plants, food, land, and people. Madeleine Greenway deftly combines drawing and printmaking to create lush portraits and still lives; each work treated with the same attention to detail manifesting as a character study for plants, family, and food. Madeleine states: "This series expresses gratitude to the matriarchal knowledge that has enabled me to provide for my family, as well as connect to plants, food, land, and people. While my inner dialogue is full of anxiety and sadness, the garden, the kitchen, and the studio give me reprieve from these thoughts. Most of the women in my family experience chronic mental or physical illness. But they were not joyless, or weak. Images of them in the garden show strong, happy, and proud women. This is the part of my family history I want to celebrate... The aim is this: to generate longing for a more intimate relationship with food, to invite the audience to the garden as a source of joy and respite, and to share a simple message of gratitude and the difference that care can make."


  • - Presenter: Prince Albert Council for the Arts
    - Location: John V. Hicks Gallery at the Prince Albert Arts Centre

    Borders can be physical, emotional, perceived and real. Borders define but a bridge provides a means to move from one place to another - whether physical or emotional - connecting to where you are.

    As an emerging newcomer artist to Canada experiencing the impact of borders of all types - connected to my past with a desire to reach out to my new surroundings – I sought to share a path forward for others experiencing this for the first time. Each has a story to tell, starting when we embark in life and shaped by everything we see and everyone we meet. We live in a changing world, exposed to new cultures and people - emotional bridging between continents and lands with many different cultures within them. With a cultures’ overlapping and building upon one another, mixing traditions and symbols, the goal of art has been to bring cultures together into one; one people, living and learning together, in one place, sharing stories and understanding each other along the way.

    'Creating Bridges: East and West' emerged as a series of paintings in 2014 through 2018 and features ten to fifteen pieces that reflect the bridging of cultures, done in mixed media on canvas with coins, metallic leaf and rich textural additions. The theme of the show was a way of sharing the story of diversity of peoples and cultures in our community as a result of immigration - crossing borders to a new place, a new community and new way of life.


  • - Presenter: Weyburn Arts Council
    - Location: Weyburn Art Gallery

    The exhibition The Spirit of Nature - Looking Beyond Yourself features fifteen paintings of different animals and insects. Each creature’s silhouette is filled with intricate Métis floral beadwork patterning. Swirling around the forms of the fauna is a diaphanous grey fog, a representation of the spirit world. Phyllis says "Each animal painting is adorned with a unique, colourful, symmetrical Métis floral beadwork design... Each bead, flower and animal are a part of something greater. Within each painting, the grey background and white flowers represent the greater universe. Hidden in each painting is a glass spirit bead. This bead, in traditional Métis beadwork, was an off colour or misplaced bead. The spirit bead symbolizes humility and it reminds us, humans are not perfect. Therefore, we need to learn to be mindful that each day is an opportunity to make improvements in ourselves for the betterment of "All of Our Relations"."

  • ᑌᐸᑯᐦᑊ/Tepakohp/7 is a multi-artist exhibition which celebrates the stories and experiences of the many Nations of Indigenous Women living on this land we call Saskatchewan. We share our stories through our art to amplify, inspire and educate about the diverse relationships and transactions we have to this land and each other.


  • - Presenter: Station Arts Centre Cooperative
    - Location: Station Arts Centre Cooperative

    Micro and Macro of the Boreal Forest serves to juxtapose two very different yet integrally connected elements of the forest ecosystem, the microbiome found along the boulders inhabiting Canadian shield lakes and the bears and ungulates which that microbiome ultimately nourishes and sustains.

    Greg Allen paints the intricacies of the algae, lichen and moss which over time slowly come to cover the rocks and boulders found along the shoreline of boreal forest lakes while Jeff Meldrum sets up camera traps to capture bears, elk and deer interacting with his artistic interventions in the landscape.

    By showcasing the two works together, the artists hope to prompt viewers to consider the complexity of the ecology, systems both big and small, while fostering an appreciation for the aesthetics bound within the boreal forest.


  • - Presenter: Shellbrook & District Arts Council
    - Location: Shellbrook & District Arts Council

    Edie Marshall is an established Saskatchewan landscape painter of sensitivity and skill. Over her career she has explored different ways to interpret landscape, movement, and the passage of time. It is immediately apparent in her paintings that Marshall is not a tourist on the prairies, but someone who has a long term, intimate relationship to this place. Her particular talent lies in her ability to evoke multi-sensory experiences for the viewer, allowing them to be fully immersed in the landscapes of our prairie home. -Madeleine Greenway
9 1193 11-1-2023