Events from April 01, 2024



  • - Presenter: Tisdale Arts Council
    - Location: Tisdale Community Library

    Edie Marshall is an established Saskatchewan landscape painter of sensitivity and skill. Over her career she has explored different ways to interpret landscape, movement, and the passage of time. It is immediately apparent in her paintings that Marshall is not a tourist on the prairies, but someone who has a long term, intimate relationship to this place. Her particular talent lies in her ability to evoke multi-sensory experiences for the viewer, allowing them to be fully immersed in the landscapes of our prairie home. -Madeleine Greenway


  • - Presenter: Biggar & District Arts Council
    - Location: Biggar Museum and Gallery

    Propagation explores the connections between plants, food, land, and people. Madeleine Greenway deftly combines drawing and printmaking to create lush portraits and still lives; each work treated with the same attention to detail manifesting as a character study for plants, family, and food. Madeleine states: "This series expresses gratitude to the matriarchal knowledge that has enabled me to provide for my family, as well as connect to plants, food, land, and people. While my inner dialogue is full of anxiety and sadness, the garden, the kitchen, and the studio give me reprieve from these thoughts. Most of the women in my family experience chronic mental or physical illness. But they were not joyless, or weak. Images of them in the garden show strong, happy, and proud women. This is the part of my family history I want to celebrate... The aim is this: to generate longing for a more intimate relationship with food, to invite the audience to the garden as a source of joy and respite, and to share a simple message of gratitude and the difference that care can make."


  • - Presenter: Kindersley & District Arts Council
    - Location: Garden Gallery

    Micro and Macro of the Boreal Forest serves to juxtapose two very different yet integrally connected elements of the forest ecosystem, the microbiome found along the boulders inhabiting Canadian shield lakes and the bears and ungulates which that microbiome ultimately nourishes and sustains.

    Greg Allen paints the intricacies of the algae, lichen and moss which over time slowly come to cover the rocks and boulders found along the shoreline of boreal forest lakes while Jeff Meldrum sets up camera traps to capture bears, elk and deer interacting with his artistic interventions in the landscape.

    By showcasing the two works together, the artists hope to prompt viewers to consider the complexity of the ecology, systems both big and small, while fostering an appreciation for the aesthetics bound within the boreal forest.


  • - Presenter: Melville Arts Council
    - Location: Gallery Works and The Third Dimension

    The exhibition The Spirit of Nature - Looking Beyond Yourself features fifteen paintings of different animals and insects. Each creature’s silhouette is filled with intricate Métis floral beadwork patterning. Swirling around the forms of the fauna is a diaphanous grey fog, a representation of the spirit world. Phyllis says "Each animal painting is adorned with a unique, colourful, symmetrical Métis floral beadwork design... Each bead, flower and animal are a part of something greater. Within each painting, the grey background and white flowers represent the greater universe. Hidden in each painting is a glass spirit bead. This bead, in traditional Métis beadwork, was an off colour or misplaced bead. The spirit bead symbolizes humility and it reminds us, humans are not perfect. Therefore, we need to learn to be mindful that each day is an opportunity to make improvements in ourselves for the betterment of "All of Our Relations"."


  • - Presenter: Station Arts Centre Cooperative
    - Location: Station Arts Satellite Gallery

    Surface All The Way Through is an exhibition of textile and text-based signs assembled from discarded plastic using hobby-craft techniques. It is an exploration of superficiality, distraction, reflection, containment, emotional blockages, consumerism, accumulation, and waste.

    The objects in this show are fabricated entirely of plastic: a material that I am endlessly attracted to for its shape-shifting mimicry and limitless supply of exciting surface qualities. As a toxic, uncontainable, and grossly over-produced material, it is also repulsive and surrounds me with dread and despair. It is between opposites that I have created these objects: working to both deflect and deal with my own conflicting attitudes in a time of vast uncertainty, inexpressible emotions, and constant horror.

    All materials in the show were rescued from their fate as discarded objects, collected either from my own personal consumption habits (packaging waste) or from the thrift store (craft supplies, projects, decorations).

  • ᑌᐸᑯᐦᑊ/Tepakohp/7 is a multi-artist exhibition which celebrates the stories and experiences of the many Nations of Indigenous Women living on this land we call Saskatchewan. We share our stories through our art to amplify, inspire and educate about the diverse relationships and transactions we have to this land and each other.
6 1193 04-1-2024